Paula Marcus Joins Vistage New York CEO Peer Group

February 8, 2016

Paula Marcus

Welcome Paula Marcus, the CEO of Ayers International Corp, a woman owned business that distributes specialty chemicals, who joined Vistage NYC in Manhattan. Ayers International has been servicing the needs of the chemical industry for over 31 years in the fields of oil industry, mining, hair coloring, water treatment, paints and coatings, personal care, contract manufacturers, waterproof resins, thickeners, cable blocking and non-wovens.

We are delighted to have Paula join our CEO advisory peer group. Her unique perspective will help all of our members did deeper on challenging and important issues chief executes face.


Welcome Bill Duerr to Vistage NYC

January 29, 2016

Bill

Welcome Bill Duerr, President of Hatteras to our VistageNYC CEO private advisory board. Hatteras is a Manhattan commercial printer that provides graphic communication solutions which include creative, data, print, logistics and digital solutions. As a former Lacrosse coach, Bill brings his passion for learning to the group. We are delighted Bill has joined!


Welcome Helen Irving to Vistage New York!

January 27, 2016

Helen Irving

Helen Irving is the President and CEO of LiveOnNY, a nonprofit, federally designated organ procurement organization  dedicated to the recovery of organs and tissue for transplant in the greater New York metropolitan area. Her organization literally saves lives and you can too. If you have a New York State ID, you can register here. Here in New York. there are over 10,000 people waiting for an organ transplant. By signing up today, you can help save lives! Did you know that just ONE organ donor can save up to EIGHT lives?

We are so glad that Helen has joined our Vistage New York CEO group.


The Simple Secret to Making Better Decisions: Tap into the power of triads

January 14, 2014

Check out the article at http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/738edaa8#/738edaa8/8


3 Tips for Great Management

December 13, 2013

I am so proud of my daughter who has been my best student—brings real issues, listens, takes action, and reports what happens. Here is what she wrote in her blog. Please follow her at https://twitter.com/mwdejesus

Dear Fellow Managers,

We suck. Before you curse me and defend yourself, I say this out of love—and it applies to me as well. As a group (supervisors, managers) we are ineffective.  For the most part we have been on the job for TEN years before we get any specific leadership training. For years we often are winging it or maintaining crappy systems that our own untrained managers created.

We can’t be afraid to learn what we don’t know OR be critical of what we are doing.

It takes a lot of courage to look at ourselves and see where we are failing.  The higher up you go the harder it gets—but the results are that more powerful.

Read the rest at http://www.mwdejesus.com/2013/12/11/3-tips-for-great-management/



Three Actions You can Take to Create Better Leaders on Your Team

December 1, 2013

TeamAre you challenged with people that are not performing to your expectations? Do you feel that your employees are not doing all they could? Maybe it is caused by your mid-level managers.

Authors Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman said in their book, First Break All the Rules: What The Worlds’ Greatest Managers Do Differently, that people don’t leave jobs, they leave managers.

A survey of 2000 workers by management consultants Orion Partner found that almost half (47%) said “their managers made them feel threatened.”

It is no wonder why we have such a high percentage of Stage Two cultures. (Stage Two is a private conversation that “my life sucks”). My life would suck too if I felt threatened by my manager.

Why do managers behave this way? I believe that most don’t know better. A survey of 17,000 leaders found that “Average age for their first leadership training was 42, about 10 years after they began supervising people, and almost 20 years after they started experiencing leadership in organizations.” (Zenger/Folkman)

We are failing to train the very people that are responsible for our success.

What can you do?

  1. Offer leadership training. Organizations like Vistage offer training for Key Executives in addition to CEOs.
  2. Read books as a leadership team and review the principles. Some of my favorites are the following:
  1. Watch videos & TED talks and discuss as a group. These are some excellent ones:
    1. Dan Pink: The puzzle of Motivation
    2. Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action
    3. David Logan: Tribal leadership
    4. Vishen Lakhiani: World’s Greatest Workplace

The Enemy of Openness by Mark Taylor at TEDxTimesSquare

May 7, 2013

Key Points:

  • There is an enemy bouncing in our heads. It’s the enemy of openness “We think we’re open, but we’re not.”
  •  Openness is the grand illusion.
  • Social psychologists tell us the brain is wired for self-justification.
    • Biologists say that we cannot tell a perception from hallucination.
    • The only way we know that we’re not delusional is through feedback But here is the catch— with just two people, we still don’t know.  I see black and you see white—who is right?

When we have a dyadic relationship, perception is inherently unstable; especially when we disagree or have a difference of opinion.

We get stuck. We argue. We get defensive.

One person is right and the other wrong. The idea is good or bad.  Notice that we like people who agree with us and dislike those who don’t.

But openness is being able to listen when we don’t agree. How can we overcome this biological blindness?

The answer is the Power of Triads—two vs three.

A 12 year study of 24,000 people concluded 76% of work relationships are ineffective. (Tribal Leadership 2008)

That’s 3 out of 4 people who are being challenged at work – by dyadic relationships. What’s interesting is that the other 24% had a 3-5 times increase in productivity, less stress, & more fun. They also had one unique characteristic. They did not meet in dyads.” They met in groups of three. They used the power of triads.

A sandbox with two children and one toy—what happens? They fight.  “It’s mine!” Add a third child to our sandbox and the dynamic changes. We build a sand castle together.

This is the power of Triads. Three people working together on a common project. There is a shift from mine to ours.

Triads defeat the enemy of openness; Triads pull us from being stuck in the mud of dyads.

 Triads move us and others into action.

To create a “we” takes three.

So, the next time you get stuck in a sandbox with just one other person—remember the Power of Triads.


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